Our Approach

We are a boutique management consultancy with an absolute focus on client service and a passion for making a difference, within our clients and with the broader community.

We understand the value of teamwork and that this requires a respect for each other’s talents and abilities.  Importantly, it demands a respect for the combined knowledge, experience and capabilities of our clients.  It is not for us to be ‘the sage on the stage’, but rather the ‘guide on the side’, enabling our clients to achieve the best possible outcomes.  Above all else, we value integrity.  We expect that of our people at all times, and constantly ask ourselves the question, ‘what is best for the client?’

Being a small, growth firm we do not stand on ceremony or take ourselves too seriously.  But we take our work and our ability to best serve our clients very seriously.  This demands a no-ego approach combined with a comprehensive commitment to professionalism.  Our professionalism comes from our mind-set, our attitudes, our work and our attention, not just to the big picture thinking that the strategic perspective requires, but to detail that ensures we continue to create value for our clients.

We understand that consulting is a challenging and rewarding career.  But it is not for everyone.  It requires a disciplined approach to problem solving, an ability to assist clients rather than telling them what to do, and a willingness to stretch that little bit further to enable clients and colleagues to achieve their goals.

In all this, we value family and life beyond work.  Our culture recognises the need for flexibility and the importance of leading a balanced life.  We also appreciate the challenges this presents to our people, individually and as a team.  We actively collaborate to enable each person to fulfil their own desires and commitments.

FROM OUR BLOG

Artificial Intelligence way forward for WA

By John Barrington (published in The West Australian on 3 August 2017)

My entrepreneurial father questioned my decision to pursue a career in information technology in the early eighties. Computers, he said, would become a workplace menace, killing jobs and creating an underclass of unemployed.